Databarracks recognised for second consecutiv... » London-based provider Databarracks has been recognised in Gartner’s June 2016 Magic Quadrant for Dis... INSURERS OFFER BETTER DEAL FOR ARMED FORCES PERS... » Armed Forces personnel posted overseas will from today (Saturday 25 June) be able to keep their moto... Qognify wins Government Security News’ 2016 Airpor... » Qognify, formerly NICE Security has announced that it has been awarded three Government Security New... NSI launches Powered Gates Certification Sche... » The National Security Inspectorate (NSI) has announced today the launch of its ground-breaking Power... Royal Engineers present Blesma with a cheque for... » Earlier this month, Blesma’s Chief Executive (and former Royal Engineer) Barry Le Grys, Associate Di... Wireless lock technology opens the door to new a... » Axis Communications will be demonstrating its AXIS A1001 Network Door Controller, alongside ASSA ABL... Celebrating National Women in Engineering Day: Eng... » As a nation, Britain has a knack for producing and harbouring engineering talent. Throughout history... UEFA European Championship apps may violate Brin... » Maidenhead, U.K: With EURO 2016 in full swing, football fans around the world are watching 24 teams ... MBDA and DCI team up in capacity-based training » Paris: Défense Conseil International (DCI) and MBDA France have signed a Memorandum of Understanding... CMI Defence and Ricardo together for the UK ‘Cha... » Belgian weapons systems designer, manufacturer and integrator CMI Defence, and Ricardo UK Ltd, have ...

CLICK HERE TO

Viewpoints Header

In response to the news that Oracle has carried out an emergency security update on Java, Lamar Bailey, Director of Security Research and Development at nCircle has the following comments:

 

Here we go yet again. 2013 has seen a surge of critical vulnerabilities in IE, Java and Ruby on Rails. Attackers are targeting cross platform applications to try to obtain access to as many systems as possible using as few exploits as possible.

Oracle has taken a beating this year on Java. It is good to see they are fixing critical vulnerabilities in a code base they want to quit updating but it is past time for them to get serious and do a deep dive on Java to fix the security issues.

I have always thought Oracle did a good job of securing their products but I am losing some of my faith in them with the rash of Java vulnerabilities. I hope these security problems are not found in their other products. My advice to end users is to remove Java from your system and only install it when is needed to access a business critical application, then if possible run Java in a VM or an isolated environment. This is easier said than done as my Windows box had no less that 4 Java versions with various updates. I hope Oracle will assign a team of their best security engineers to Java to squash any of the remaining security issues. Until then many users will be updating Java as often as they update AV signatures.