Mimecast ranked among the fastest growing techno... » London, UK: Mimecast has been ranked on the Deloitte Technology Fast 500 EMEA 2014, a ranking of the... gateprotect once again awarded the quality label ‘... » Hamburg: gateprotect GmbH, the German IT security specialist and member of the Rohde & Schwarz Group... The U.S. and Cuba » The White House, Washington Yesterday, after more than 50 years, we began to change America's rela... Why is an integrated network health solution criti... » Networks have become a strategic business asset that glues together the data, the applications, and ... Nuix joins McAfee security Innovation Alliance P... » LONDON, UK: Nuix has joined the McAfee Security Innovation Alliance program. Nuix and McAfee are now... IGEL updates Windows Embedded firmware and expands... » Reading, UK: IGEL Technology has updated its firmware for its Windows Embedded Standard 7 thin clien... ForgeRock reveals 2015 technology predictions » Bristol: ForgeRock Inc. has revealed its 2015 technology predictions. The company expects to see inc... Lancope unveils newly enhanced, world-Class cust... » Company has increased its investment in customer success by 150 percent this year LONDON UK: Lanco... ANNUAL ARMED FORCES COVENANT REPORT PUBLISHED » THE Armed Forces Covenant Annual Report has been presented to Parliament today and details the progr... Opengear Continues EMEA Momentum » Slough UK:  Opengear has announced its most impressive year in EMEA with across the board growth. 2...

CLICK HERE TO

Viewpoints Header

In response to the news that Oracle has carried out an emergency security update on Java, Lamar Bailey, Director of Security Research and Development at nCircle has the following comments:

 

Here we go yet again. 2013 has seen a surge of critical vulnerabilities in IE, Java and Ruby on Rails. Attackers are targeting cross platform applications to try to obtain access to as many systems as possible using as few exploits as possible.

Oracle has taken a beating this year on Java. It is good to see they are fixing critical vulnerabilities in a code base they want to quit updating but it is past time for them to get serious and do a deep dive on Java to fix the security issues.

I have always thought Oracle did a good job of securing their products but I am losing some of my faith in them with the rash of Java vulnerabilities. I hope these security problems are not found in their other products. My advice to end users is to remove Java from your system and only install it when is needed to access a business critical application, then if possible run Java in a VM or an isolated environment. This is easier said than done as my Windows box had no less that 4 Java versions with various updates. I hope Oracle will assign a team of their best security engineers to Java to squash any of the remaining security issues. Until then many users will be updating Java as often as they update AV signatures.