HAUD SS7 firewall protects 23m subscribers in Vi... » Vinaphone to benefit from market leading security & monetisation solution Malta: Go-to partner in... Nuisance calls global report from Hiya: US, Hong... » Hiya, the call-blocking and caller ID company, has released its new Robocall Radar Report, which rev... FireMon acquires FortyCloud for multi-cloud m... » LONDON, UK: FireMon has announced its acquisition of FortyCloud, a field-proven cloud infrastructure... Southwark Council brings digital courtroom te... » With the aim of modernising court services, the London Borough of Southwark has successfully introdu... Data protection veteran is backup, recovered and... » LEEDS, UK: Data protection expert and industry veteran Simon Chappell has announced the launch of As... CNL Software expands Americas Operations » CNL Software has announced that it has expanded its U.S. operations with the opening of its new Regi... Mirantis & Openwave Mobility collaborate on Subs... » REDWOOD CITY, Calif: Openwave Mobility has announced a collaboration with Mirantis, the pure play Op... AV-TEST: Secucloud Mobile Security App named as ... » Hamburg, Germany: People now use their smartphone to access the internet more than any other device ... vCPE technology will create a “win-win” situatio... » LONDON: Enterprises demand is one of the key driving factors for cloud applications, but businesses ... BeyondTrust CEO, Kevin Hickey, elected to Arizona ... » PHOENIX: BeyondTrust has announced that its president and CEO, Kevin Hickey, has been elected to the...


Advertise with Vigilance

Got News?

Got news for Vigilance?

Have you got news/articles for us? We welcome news stories and articles from security experts, intelligence analysts, industry players, security correspondents in the main stream media and our numerous readers across the globe.


Subscribe to Vigilance Weekly

Information Security Header

A new attack makes some password cracking faster, easier than ever. A researcher has devised a method that reduces the time and resources required to crack passwords that are protected by the SHA1 cryptographic algorithm.

Tal Be'ery, Web Researcher at Imperva has looked into the SHA1 methodology and why companies should stay clear of using this method to protect passwords:


"First, some context. One of the main use cases for hashing function, such as the SHA-1 function, is to store passwords securely. When attackers obtain such hashed password, they need to launch a “brute force” attack against it, in order to reveal the password. “Brute force” means, they need to repeatedly guess the password, apply the hashing function on it and compare the result with their hash password they have. The security researcher has found an algorithmic shortcut in SHA-1 calculation that makes the computation easier, thus reducing the time needed to successfully “brute force” an attack.

The corollary? In case the hashing is done for security (e.g. hash user passwords, verify data integrity, etc.):

MD5 is dead and should never be used.

SHA-1 is going in the same direction. Consider an upgrade of existing systems and definitely don't use it for new systems.

A smart choice would be to follow the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recommendation for federal agencies: "Federal agencies should stop using SHA-1 for generating digital signatures, generating time stamps and for other applications that require collision resistance."

Best option? Use a hash function from SHA-2 family, such as the SHA256."