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Defence and Security Strategy

North Korea flexing its muscle this morning launched its satellite into orbit, but has drawn the ire of world leaders who are quite furious at such madness and defiance. In Britain, Foreign Secretary, William Hague let go his hammer on the head of DPRK over the satellite launch when he said said:“I strongly condemn the DPRK’s satellite launch today. This launch was a clear violation of UN Security Council Resolutions 1718 and 1874 as it involved the testing of ballistic missile technology. This provocative act will increase tensions in the region. I deplore the fact that the DPRK has chosen to prioritise this launch over improving the livelihood of its people."

Hague declared furiously: "We will be summoning the DPRK Ambassador to the UK to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the UK will urgently consult partners in the United Nations Security Council on our response to this development. It is essential that the DPRK refrain from further provocative action and take constructive steps towards denuclearisation and lasting peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula.”

China was no less furious, regretting the Democratic People's Republic of Korea's (DPRK) satellite launch amid the "universal" concern of the international community. A Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei blasted DPRK's gross irresponsibility: "The Chinese side always holds that (all sides concerned) should find an ultimate way to long-lasting peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula through dialogues and consultations," Hong said: "(We) hope that all sides concerned will keep calm on the issue and make joint efforts to safeguard the overall situation of peace and stability on the peninsula".

Hong said: "The DPRK is entitled to the peaceful use of outer space, but that right is currently restrained by relevant UN Security Council resolutions," adding that the DPRK, as a member of the United Nations, is obliged to observe the Security Council resolutions.

On Security Council's expected action, Hong said the Chinese side holds that the Security Council's response should be "prudent and moderate" and conducive to maintaining the overall peace and stability of the peninsula instead of escalating tensions there.

The launch this morning marked the DPRK's second attempt this year and its fifth attempt since 1998 to launch a long-range rocket.

Despite the flurry of global outcry, the DPRK, whose previous attempt in April was a fiasco, said that the satellite would be used for peaceful and scientific purposes only, while assuring that it would abide by international regulations

Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird today issued the following statement:

“Canada unequivocally condemns North Korea’s provocative ballistic missile test.

“North Korea’s reckless actions clearly demonstrate its wilful defiance of its international obligations, outlined in numerous United Nations Security Council resolutions.

“The regime in Pyongyang is a grave threat to the security and stability of the region and beyond.

“With this latest launch, the rogue regime has once again shown total disregard for its people by choosing to fund military and nuclear programs while the basic needs of the North Korean people go unmet.

“Canada urges North Korea to cease this reckless behaviour and to live up to its international obligations.

“Canada stands with the international community in condemning this reprehensible act."

Regarding the cost of DPRK's madness, South Korea's government has estimated Pyongyang spent $1.3 billion on its rocket programme this year.

It is said the two rockets launched this year -- this week's mission and a failed attempt in April -- cost $600 million, while the launch site itself is estimated at $400 million. Other related facilities add another $300 million, according to an official from South Korea's Ministry of Unification. "This is equivalent to acquiring 4.6 million tons of corn," the official said. "If this was used for solving the food shortage issue, North Koreans would not have to worry about food for four to five years

According to international observers the rocket, launched at 09:49 local time (00:49 GMT), appears to have followed its planned trajectory, with stages falling in expected areas.

DPRK's closest neighbour North Korea said a satellite had been placed in orbit; whilst the the US confirmed an object had been put into space.

As other nations of the world South Korea, the US and Japan had blast the launch saying it was a disguised test of long-range missile technology.

It would be recalled that a UN resolution passed in June 2009 after North Korea's second nuclear test banned Pyongyang from ballistic missile tests.

The US described the madness as a "highly provocative act that threatens regional security", while UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said it was a "clear violation" of the UN resolution.

On it part, Japan is said to have called for an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council.